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POETRY

ON THE EXTINCTION OF THE VENETIAN REPUBLIC – Poetry, by William Wordsworth

ON THE EXTINCTION OF THE VENETIAN REPUBLIC > Once did She hold the gorgeous east in fee; and was the safeguard of the west: the worth of Venice did not fall below her birth, Venice, the eldest Child of Liberty. She was a maiden City, bright and free; no guile seduced, no force could violate; and, when she took unto …

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CELESTIAL LOVE – Poetry, by Michelangelo Buonarroti

Despite making few forays beyond the arts, his versatility in the disciplines he took up was of such a high order. Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475/1564) was an Italian Renaissance painter, but also sculptor, architect, poet, and engineer. He is considered a contender for the title of the archetypal Renaissance man, along with his rival and fellow Leonardo da Vinci. CELESTIAL LOVE …

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BLACK RIDERS CAME FROM THE SEA – Poetry, by Stephen Crane

BLACK RIDERS CAME FROM THE SEA > Black riders came from the sea. There was clang and clang of spear and shield, and clash and clash of hoof and heel, wild shouts and the wave of hair, in the rush upon the wind. Thus the ride of sin. http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Poems-Stephen-Crane/dp/0801491304

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DEATH – Poetry, by Emily Dickinson

DEATH > Because I could not stop for Death, he kindly stopped for me. The carriage held but just ourselves, and Immortality. We slowly drove, he knew no haste, and I had put away my labor, and my leisure too, for his civility. We passed the school, where children strove at recess, in the ring. We passed the fields of …

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ONE ART – Poetry, by Elizabeth Bishop

ONE ART > The art of losing isn’t hard to master. So many things seem filled with the intent to be lost that their loss is no disaster. Lose something every day. Accept the fluster of lost door keys, the hour badly spent. The art of losing isn’t hard to master. Then practice losing farther, losing faster: places, and names, …

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DADDY – Poetry, by Sylvia Plath

DADDY – You do not do, you do not do any more, black shoe in which I have lived like a foot for thirty years, poor and white, barely daring to breathe or Achoo. Daddy, I have had to kill you. You died before I had time. Marble-heavy, a bag full of God, ghastly statue with one gray toe, big …

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THE PEOPLE, YES – Poetry, by Carl Sandburg

THE PEOPLE, YES – The people yes, the people will live on. The learning and blundering people will live on. They will be tricked and sold and again sold, and go back to the nourishing earth for rootholds, the people so peculiar in renewal and comeback, you can’t laugh off their capacity to take it. The mammoth rests between his …

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STOPPING BY WOODS ON A SNOWY EVENING – Poetry, by Robert Frost

STOPPING BY WOODS ON A SNOWY EVENING – Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the village though. He will not see me stopping here, to watch his woods fill up with snow. My little horse must think it queer, to stop without a farmhouse near, between the woods and frozen lake, the darkest evening …

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THE DRIVING IRISH FORCE – William Butler Yeats: my arms are like the twisted thorn

THE FISHERMAN, by William Butler Yeats > Although I can see him still, the freckled man who goes to a gray place on a hill, in gray Connemara clothes, at dawn to cast his flies. It’s long since I began to call up to the eyes, this wise and simple man. All day I’d looked in the face what I …

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CARLO ALBERTO SALUSTRI, ALIAS TRILUSSA – The cynical Roman version of La Fontane: three sonnets

Among the Roman dialect poets, Trilussa (1871/1950), is by far the most well-known and appreciated outside his own hometown. His mature work falls broadly into two types (sonnets and fables), however, it wasat the poetic fable that Trilussa truly excelled, developing a distinctly cynical Roman version (of the genre of Aesop and La Fontaine). Among his many artistic merits, he …

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