Home » Book » GUIDOBALDO WAS WAITING FOR HIM: The Duke, explained to his guest the significance of each of the paintings on the walls, that represented the liberal arts, symbolized by female figures on thrones

GUIDOBALDO WAS WAITING FOR HIM: The Duke, explained to his guest the significance of each of the paintings on the walls, that represented the liberal arts, symbolized by female figures on thrones

…………………….. Guidobaldo II della Rovere was waiting for him in the great library of the palace, he dispensed with the bow due to him for the difference in rank, and took his arm asking him news of the Pope and the family who was awaiting at Montecodruzzo his new count. Walking to the studiolo, the Duke explained to his guest the significance of each of the paintings on the walls that represented the liberal arts, symbolized by female figures on thrones. Every art was portrayed in the act of delivering their own emblem to Federico II and other members of the court, assigning them as ideal servants.

Inside the ducal studiolo, Giacomo’s gaze was caught by the portrait of Federico da Montefeltro II, seated and covered with armour clad giornea, caught in the act of reading, with his son Guidobaldo, probably at the age of two, to his right. The armour worn by Federico was identical to that shown in inlaid wood behind his friend Della Rovere. That inlay had been made by Baccio Pontelli, and depicted a slightly open curtain, behind which hung the same pieces of armour represented in the painting. He and the duke had first met ten years ago, when Giacomo was imprisoned in Castel Sant’Angelo in Rome because of his past relationship with the Carafa family.

It was Guidobaldo who, five years before, was his in Pesaro, where he had moved his court to defend himself against the charges made by Venice. It was thanks to that Della Rovere that he had been able to serve Philip II of Spain by joining him with 2,000 men from Urbino for the defence of Malta that was besieged by the Turks. Sitting in the inlaid studiolo, near the window from which the Duke had waved to him, Giacomo listened how Guidobaldo was picking up a new contingent of armed men who he intended to make available to Don Giovanni of Austria, the half-brother of Philip II of Spain, who had been put in charge of the league of Christian states who are preparing to fight the Turks on land and at sea.

The fleets of Spain, Genoa, Venice, Malta and Tuscany were to meet in Messina with the ships of the pope from the port of Civitavecchia. The son of the Duke, Francesco Maria, had already asked for and received from his father permission to gather together 300 nobles, with whom to embark at Genoa. While his father was gathering troops not only from the Duchy of Urbino, but also in the town and countryside of Fano, then he would stand in as governor in the name of the pope. He was counting on gathering at least 2,000 armed men, that would embark at Naples, some on the galleys of Philip II of Spain and some on those of the Pope. ……………

TheLastRowTHE LAST ROW, is a novel published by Meeting Benches, in the english e-book version http://meetingbenches.com/e-book-english-version/ divided into two parts named THE LAST ROW and EMOTIONS OFTHE RENAISSANCE  (also separately purchased), while in same e-book named L’ULTIMA VOGA, into the italian version http://meetingbenches.com/book-italian-version/ . This page is taken from the pages of love and adventure. The two parallel stories that you are reading, they are made of emotions and feelings, and those of Bianca and Jacopo fragile human beings who move their feet to the inside of two horizons: the Battle of Lepanto, and the tranquility of a city of the province of central Italy. The fortuitous discovery of old chains convict, will unite the two horizons, merging them into a single dimension. The first part is fictional, while the second consists of 13 thematic routes Renaissance in Central Italy, exactly in the places narrated by the author.L'UltimaVoga copy

 

Check Also

A TOAST TO ICELAND – Jónas Hallgrímsson

The style of the times He was one of the founding fathers of Romanticism in ...

Leave a Reply